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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
with michael oh hanlon, i'm sorry, the coauthor of bending history, barack obama's foreign policy. senior from brookings institution. general bob scale, retired general and fox news military analyst. general scales, to you first, he suggested that a more muscular foreign policy especially with regards to the middle east is needed right now. did you hear it that way? >> boy i sure did, jon. one of the things. this is the first speech i hear him give where he establishes a clear difference from the administration. he focuses exclusively on the middle east and not on china and russia. secondly his tone is more strident and confrontational. a clear swing from the soft power approach of this administration over to a more strident and approach to national security. he talked about the not reducing the defense budget substantially and increasing our level of security in our armed forces which we haven't heard before. so this speech i think, sort of stakes out his national security for the first time. there is clear separation what he said just a few minutes ago and what we heard from the current admi
presentation will be michael from "time" magazine to give the land scape in politics and what's happening. i'll run through a little -- some of the questions that i think we might m to be asking, the beyond sticker shock questions, do that quickly, and then we'll -- and then we'll be joined by trevor potter, katherine -- trevor potter, a partner in captain and drive, and dale. we know him for years, but now the world knows him, and katherine maggie ward is a fellow here at new america and editing manager of "reason" magazine. in addition to moderating, she can provide provocation which is useful. with no further adieu, thank you, all, for coming, and i'll tern it over to michael. >> i wonder who knew trevor when he was a lawyer for john mccain, an important job, nothing like being a lawyer for steven cobehr. maybe one day i can work for comedy central and people can be impressed. a brief overview. this is a graphic we ran in "time" at the end of july this summer trying the best at that moment in time to project out where the money was comes from and what the difference would be in terms of v
an opportunity to join them and say no. >> moderator: michael aron at the next question to senator menendez. >> senator menendez can the team to snipe at each other all the time. you seem to have a chilly relationship with governor christie dating back to 2006 when you were the target of an investigation when he was u.s. attorney in investigation that went nowhere. joe kyrillos by contrast is one of chris christie's best friends. economists at my best friend legislature. might the state be better off with, and set it to christiana meets in the u.s. senate, one enemy and one friend. kyrillos: i disagree with you in a salmon under the governor. i would have had the best insurance polis under the new law, affordable care act that new jersey got in the nation. his administration asked me to get a good deal for the department of human services. i did. i was the governor's enemy, i would have gotten our formulas to achieve a greater modify for new jersey transit riders and economic opportunity. if i was the enemy, would have joined him an advocate within with all the disaster we got so we could c
immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free country.org. she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political rallies. sounds like a much better assignment. [laughter] she appears on the takeaway and contributed to npr, bbc, wgvh, new york 1 and pbs. next to her is greg marx who's a staff writer for the columbia journalism review, co-editor of cjr's swing state project. he was a writer for remapping debate.org, and if you've seen his writings, which i have fold over the last few week -- followed over the last few wee
deliberately chose michael carr as one of the scientists to interview for my book was he retired -- because he retired right after he was at jpl. so to see that kind of transition. >> uh-huh. let's talk about the dangers of anthroto moretizing our rovers as we put them up there. i was following the tweets of the martian -- of curiosity, and ask sometimes they bridged into the adult. and it was great fun, it was wonderful, but as soon as you start injecting that humanity, you -- a lot of people get in trouble on twitter. [laughter] i was wondering about how much of a burden it is to say, oh, now this is as much our mascot as it is our scientist. >> well, i think that is the truth. and that was probably my biggest surprise in going through my work over these eight years, because i did start, as i said, rather upset when i first saw that 2001 press release. i was at hart and rater in july when it came out, and i remember ranting and raving to anyone who would listen to me who is this steve squires, and why is he saying these on sudden things? robot wick geologists, we're in -- robotic geologists,
if you've watched the interview. this is 15 years ago and 60 minutes michael wallace points his finger he wore a dictator. he says it several times. they say how could you not react? but now people saw his approach was very smart and would make michael wallace embarrassed. if you do the same i think would be disaster. they would act very strongly. so we do need to know this mind set, this kind of experience. so that is why henry kissinger said early on this so important to look at the defining moment and shape their view of their behavior for cooperation. >> at the g7 during the cultural revolution of heart in this generation of leaders. how does that bear out in how they view both domestic policies in china and the relationship to the world or is that not the key factor between how they see the role cox >> they cannot know yet because they are not yet in office. there have been instances they've made a very sharp response to that i've had several conversations with an extraordinarily subtle person raised a number of philosophical questions. if you look at the appointment it stated in the
't stop laughing long enough to ask a question. he's at it again. >>it's michael moore here to see the chairman. >>and this time he's serious. >>we want our money back. >>no filmmaker is more "current" than michael moore. >>there's no in between no more. there's the people that got it all and the people that have nothing. >>welcome to the housing crash. >>boom! >>do not be afraid. federal prison is a nice place. ♪ >> announcer: radio meets television, the "bill press show." >> bill: all right. 25 minutes after the hour. jud with think progress coming up next. right now we're talking about a lot of reaction to the pew poll showing obama now trailing mitt romney by four points. romney bouncing up after last week's debate. leslie is calling from cleveland, ohio. good morning. >> caller: good morning. >> bill: what do you think? >> caller: i just wanted to say they don't believe the people in cleveland where i live they are very enthused to vote. they have either voted already, or are going to vote soon and they just thought romney's performance was just a bunch of lies.
. in 1988, michael dukakis could have had help not looking so cold in his response. >> we have a professor at the george washington university, john sides. when you have those moments that reinforce a marriage, either good or for ill, to a candidate, how important or damaging can these be? >> candidate debates in a general election to not move the polls a general -- a lot. race.in a close debat in general, i think these dramatic moments in debates are not necessarily game changes for the average american voter. >> you wrote, usually the candidates fight to a drawl. . it is hard in that context to have a stunning victory or a terrible defeat. can you elaborate? >> the candidates spend a lot of time trying to lower their expectations about the performance and portray the other person as this great orator . in reality, the candidates spend a lot of time prepping for the debates and they are very good at it. they have read a lot of material and memorize a lot of material. in that context, it is hard for a candidate to really make a big enough mistake to actually swing opinion too strongly to h
on your screen, michael murphy and his service and his ultimate sacrifice for our country. jon: to his survivors, we can only say thank you for his service. jenna: and now his ship will set sail. jon: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, from the campaign trail, it is ramping up a new line of attack on governor romney. calling him dishonest and untruthful and a flat-out liar. welcome, everybody, i am megyn kelly. one website suggesting that the president and his top advisors came up with an idea and a strategy session the next morning. that idea would be to paint mr. romney is a flat-out liar. governor romney, of course, is experiencing polling momentum, and he is trying to build upon that with a foreign policy speech that he gave at the virginia military institute just an hour ago. president obama come in the meantime is in california on a campaign tour. the last 72 hours come we have seen a growing tide of political ads and remarks from campaign officials and surrogates with one central theme. mitt romney is a liar. here is a sample. >> are you saying that
to that in order to control your economic destiny you need to control your health. host: michael is a political science major. >> i will begin with the article that ran on "the nation" front- page. why have appointments gone by the wayside in this election? guest: president obama has faced obstruction but has not been as engaged with putting forward judges. by the way, the supreme court today may be years 2% of cases in this country. the docket is growing smaller and smaller, shrinking, and there is an impact of president obama not pushing as many judges through as bush did. the courts are so important, and they should be discussed in this campaign. i hope in this next debate -- it is important that this has gone under the radar. the presidents are not just individuals. they come with advisers. president reagan's nominee robert bork was rejected by the senate for being way out of the mainstream in this country. he did not believe the equal protection clause applies to women. he is opposed to the voting rights act and the silver rights act of 1964. and he believed that corporations are people. h
, senator michael bennett from colorado, who is a newer, younger member who is part of the generation that does not understand why congress works so slowly. on the republican side they added another newcomer to the senate, senator mike johans. they are meeting this week. it is different since congress is on recess, and congress has not been here since early- august. lawmakers are home, campaigning in their states or for their colleagues tried to get majorities shored up in both the house and senate. so, a group is coming into town tomorrow for a meeting off- campus at mount vernon, which is a good place for them to meet if they want to avoid reporters who tend to stop the halls and wait out the meetings to get any little snippets of news. host: from politico this week, how secret is there work? i mean, how much do we know about what they talk about, when they are meeting, and what they're doing? guest: i would say the problems the country and this congress face are known. you could easily look back over many reports and the public and private meetings to understand that most outside o
michael moore, nancy pelosi. think your local college professor. you know, think the driver of the crazy car with all of the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole foods store. you get the picture; right? they no , nominate professions leaving a cultural imprint, cultures like journal ism, arts, academia, and america's fastest band of intertapers, circumstance day sew lay success bats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small group impact our lives? what motivates them? i'm in an excellent position to answer the deep questions because i've been watching liberals closely for over 30 years, studied liberals like jane goodall studies her chimps. [laughter] in their natural habitats and without judgment, in silence mostly because we barely speak the same language. i've been tireless in research. i lived with liberals, broke bread with them, humored them, teased them, prodded them, and, yes, even loved some of them, some my friends, and some members of my own family. my commitme
need to control your health. host: michael is a political science major. >> i will begin with the article that ran on "the nation" frontpage. why have appointments gone by the wayside in this election? guest: president obama has faced obstruction but has not been as engaged with putting forward judges. by the way, the supreme court today may be years 2% of cases in this country. the dog is growing smaller and smaller, shrinking, -- the smaller andgrowing smaller, shrinking, and there is an impact of president obama not pushing as many throughout as bush did. the courts are so important, and they should be discussed in this campaign. i hope in this next debate -- it is important that this has gone under the radar. the presidents are not individual -- not just individuals. they come with advisers. president reagan's nominee robert bork was rejected by the senate for being way out of the mainstream in this country. he did not believe the equal protection clause applies to women. he is opposed to the voting rights act and the silver rights act of 1964. and he believed that co
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)